Tag Archives: webtool

The Norms of Online Global Collaborations

I am reading chapter 10 of The Global Educator this week. In this chapter, we are going through different norms of online global collaborations guiding educators on how to build collaborative relationships. There are eight norms in total, but I am focusing the first two in this blog post, and how it can be applied to the Psychology field. If you have no idea how to start online global collaborations, this blog post may be helpful, even you are not a Psychology major.

A picture with the globe as the background, and people with business attire standing at the front. The picture fits with the topic of this blog post that I am going to discuss online global collaboration.
A picture implies a global connection and community with different professions.
A logo of LinkedIn. This social media is one of my tools to build my PLN. This tool is useful that a lot of professionals upload their relevant experiences and resume there.
A logo of LinkedIn, which is one of the online tools for networking and job searching.

The first norm is to be prepared. You need to have your target to connect with and tools to work together. I like to use Twitter and LinkedIn for building the network. Twitter is good at resource sharing and quick discussions, while LinkedIn allows me to keep an eye on the job and conference opportunities. Different from the educators, psychologists seldom share teaching plans or teaching methods. Instead, we share more research studies and statistics. Therefore, professional social media are important for us to exchange resources and keep each other updated. Twitter and LinkedIn only help to get started on global collaborations. Tools can be different and specific depending on your fields. For example, profile creating tools are useful for Organizational Psychology; statistic analysis software is helpful for research studies; brain activity detecting machines are beneficial for neuropsychology. No matter which online tools you are using, most of them allow you to share your file with anyone you want. All the online tools make it easier to work together with everyone around the world anytime and anywhere. 

The second norm is about purpose. You need to know what you are collaborating for. For example, you are doing this for the short-term or long-term, which specific topics you are focusing on, etc. When applied to the Psychology field, you have to think of which area you want to work for, such as organizational psychology, clinical psychology, school psychology, or research. As I am graduating soon, I want to build my PLN, focusing on the Organizational Psychology field. For my short-term goal, I want to find a job working in the Human Resources department. Being active in LinkedIn not only provides me with job opportunities but also chances to practice skimming and scanning one’s resume. In case I am working in the Human Resources department when I graduate, it would be helpful. I can also contact with potential candidates from world-wide through LinkedIn. My long-term goal is to spread the idea of organizational psychology and see how the theory can be applied in real-world settings to create a better working environment. Therefore, I usually share my relevant experiences and knowledge on Twitter. At the same time, I gained from the article and resources professionals posted online. I learned from ideas and comments from their perspectives that they are more professional and experienced than I am. 

Although I am not directly collaborating or working together with the people I follow on collaborating tools, we are active on the same platform to learn and give back. I am now on the first few steps in building my network, and we will be fully engaged in and collaborative with people in this professional community.

What are your purpose and collaborative tools for global collaboration?

Are they specific to your professional, or can they be generally applied in different fields?

Finally, thank you for visiting my blog, and please do not forget to follow me on Twitter for more related information and discussions.
Twitter: @PoYeeWong4

Buffer – A Tool Allowing You to Create Your PLN/PLC 24/7

Nowadays, people are trying so hard to develop their networks online. Although this platform diminishes the geographic limitation so that people can communicate and share with everyone all around the world, the time zone conflict is somehow cannot be solved. Imagine you are living in the U.S., and you want to collaborate with professionals in an Asian county (i.e., Japan). There are 13 hours of differences. That means when you just back to the office at 9 a.m., People in Japan just finish work, and ready for dinner. It is inconvenient that the time you are posting and sharing on social media may limit some people to get notifications immediately.


A screenshot of Buffer app webpage showing people how is the webpage look like, and what function buttons are available.
A screenshot of Buffer webpage.

Fortunately, there is an app called Buffer, which belongs to the workflow and scheduling category, helping you to schedule posts. Buffer is a good tool that you can link it with your different social media, such as Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and LinkedIn. You can pre-type all the contents, pre-embed all links and images on Buffer, then schedule a date, day of the week, and/or specific time to post automatically. For example, you want to share a research article on Twitter in the morning time in Asia, which is your sleeping time in the U.S., you can schedule your tweet to be posted in the midnight of the U.S. time zone. Therefore, you can be active on social media anytime that you can then reply to any comments once you wake up or when you are free.

A quick guide on how to use Buffer.

A social media educator, Mattew J. Kushin, introduced Buffer to his social media collage class. With the use and comparison of two Apps (Buffer as one of the two), he wanted his students to learn the importance of scheduling, as well as the ability to analysis the best time to post to maximize the viewers. Here are his ideas for this classroom project:

“1. Students schedule content they’ve created as part of a campaign (e.g., original Tweets, Tweets sharing their blog posts, etc). using Hootsuite.

2. Students use Buffer as a compliment to Hootsuite – setting up their Buffer to post ONLY at those times that they are not posting their original content via Hoostuie. That way, when they find relevant and timely content to share, they can add it to their Buffer. If there’s no content, nothing is posted.”

Mattew Kushin (2013)

Details of Dr. Kushin’s lesson plan: USING BUFFER IN THE CLASSROOM TO TEACH STUDENTS SOCIAL MEDIA SCHEDULING.

A college student, Katherout, also shared her own experiences using Buffer for her Internship during the semester. She also mentioned the time zone problem and the characteristics of Buffer – being able to share the same/different post(s) to one or more media account(s) at the same time.

In her video, she talked about Buffer from 4:08 to 4:52.

Katherout, a college student introduced apps she found useful.

I also used Buffer before to manage my Instagram account. I had a planner account sharing my planner decoration ideas, calligraphy practices, and any other kinds of writing stuff. I wanted to regularly post as much as so I could boost my number of followers. However, I was too busy with my class schedule that I did not have break time between classes. Therefore, I scheduled posting on Buffer to help me post on Instagram while I was having classes, and even during my sleep. I found it useful that I could keep my account active even I was not online every day. As I remembered, I had about 20 followers more within two weeks, which was a great increasing ratio to me when comparing to the past.

Finally, hope you all find this post helpful, and feel free to share your ideas or toolbox with me!

Please don’t forget to follow me on Twitter for updates and more relevant information sharing.
Twitter: @PoYeeWong4